LI Road Rated Most Dangerous Road in NY

Many people who live in the Tri-State area believe that the area’s most dangerous roads sit within the NY Metro areas, such as Manhattan, Queens and the other boroughs.  However, the Tri-State Transportation Campaign confirms that Long Island’s roads top the list of the most dangerous roads.  Most of these roadways are State or County built and maintained, designed simply for fast moving automobile traffic. Rosenberg & Gluck wants to make the public aware of these dangerous roads and to be informed of the conditions and hazards so as to avoid injuries and accidents when traveling these roads.

According to News 12 Long Island, here are the roads identified as the most dangerous on Long Island:

TOPPING THE LIST FOR THE NUMBER 1 MOST DANGEROUS ROAD IN THE TRI-STATE AREA:  Route 25.  This road spans throughout the length of the Island, from Jericho in Nassau County to Orient Point, at the eastern end of Long Island.  Most pedestrian deaths that occurred between 2011 and 2013 were on the 11.5-mile stretch of Route 25 from Centereach to Ridge.

SUFFOLK COUNTY ROADS:

  • Route 27, Sunrise Highway, Montauk Point State Highway and County Road 39
  • Route 1, County Line Road from Amityville to the intersection of Route 110 and Southern State Parkway

NASSAU COUNTY ROADS

  • Route 24, Hempstead Turnpike
  • Merrick Road
  • Route 27, Sunrise Highway
  • Wicks Road

Here are some tips to keep in mind to stay safe on these roads: WALKERS: DON’T TAKE THE RISK

  1. HOLD ONTO CHILDREN!
    • Children, because they are small, are hard to see by drivers.
    • Cognitive skills such as judging traffic speed and distance are skills not yet developed.
  2. BE VISIBLE!
    • 32% of pedestrian fatalities occur between 8 o’clock p.m. and midnight.
    • Wear light colored clothing during the day and reflective clothing at night.
    • Stay in well-lit areas.
    • Try to make eye contact with drivers of stopped vehicles before you cross in front of them.
  3. AVOID DISTRACTIONS!
    • PUT DOWN YOUR PHONE!
    • Don’t wear head phones.
    • Don’t walk while drunk or impaired.
    • 34% of pedestrian casualties were the fault of an impaired pedestrian.
  4. FOLLOW TRAFFIC SIGNS AND SIGNALS!
    • Use crosswalks and obey signals.
    • Use sidewalks. If there is no sidewalk, walk on the left side of the road, or shoulder if available, facing traffic.
    • Be aware of the Rules of the Road.
    • Try to make eye contact with drivers of stopped vehicles before you cross in front of them.
    • Pedestrians don’t always have the right of way. If there is no crosswalk, sign or signal, then pedestrians must yield the right of way to vehicles.
  5. STAY OUT OF THE ROAD!
    • Use sidewalks and crosswalks whenever possible.
    • Walk on the left side of the road, or shoulder if available, facing traffic.
    • Cross at a well-lit spot on the road.
    • Wait for traffic to be all clear before crossing.
    • Avoid highways and roads where pedestrians are prohibited.
    • Look Both Ways Always: Look Left, Look Right, and then Look Left Again.
  6. DRIVERS: VIGILANCE AT ALL TIMES
    • CROSSWALKS ARE FOR PEOPLE!
    • Pedestrians have the right of way in crosswalks.
    • Reduce speed approaching crosswalks.
    • When stopped for a pedestrian, be sure other vehicles can see the crosswalk.
    • Never pass another vehicle stopped at a crosswalk.
  7. USE CAUTION!
    • Don’t speed.
    • Be extra diligent in poor road conditions, such as bad weather or night time driving.
    • Lower your speed in school zones and pay attention to speed limit signs/warnings.
    • Make sure it is safe to back up. Pedestrians, especially children, are harder to see when backing up.

If you or someone you know has been injured in a car accident, contact Rosenberg & Gluck for a free case evaluation.